Used car tires and some pioneer spirit


(.) #1

I found a used tire on the road. I picked it up and I brought it home.
I cut the rims off. I got a belt like something with lots of steel wires sticking
out of it. I cut it in half alongside to get two belts. I looped the to belts
together like rubber bands. It took some wrestling skills to do that manually.
An electric saw proved to be useful during the cutting.

This can be done with more tires and a long link chain of rubber bands can
be made for probably a mooring line.

I guess cutting four rubber bands out of a tire is possible. I do not know
how strong that is, but there is some steel reinforcement in the rubber.

So far so much. Thank you for the tip.
I wish you well;


Modular Extension | Connectors | Cellular expansion | Building Technology
Modular Extension | Connectors | Cellular expansion | Building Technology
(.) #2

tire1


(.) #3

Here is another picture of it.
Looks like I just posted the same picture twice. Sorry.


(.) #4

A longer chain can be made similar to this:
chainofrubberbands


(.) #5

Next time I will try to cut 4 bands out of 1 tire.
This, first one was made by cutting 2 bands out of 1 tire.


#6

IMHO, if it was me, I’d use some of the synthetic belted, rather than steel. Rust could lead to Tetanus.

If they’re using old tires for reefs, near where you are, old tires may be acceptable, but, they may continue to off-gas petroleum for decades and be a problem.


(.) #7

Synthetic belted might be a good idea, I will check into that.

About the rust leading to tetanus, I would need a link.
I would need a link about the petroleum degassing for decades from old tires

.


(.) #8

Hmmm, interesting ideas.


#9

Maybe not Tetanus, specifically, from seawater, but plenty else…

http://www.expeditionmedicine.co.uk/index.php/advice/resource/r-0043.html

Dealing with Marine and Saltwater Infections

I have been wanting to write a post about this topic, for some time now. I saw a fair number of these types of wounds, working in Greece, over the summer. My interest in these types of unique infections started in med school, treating oil rig workers from the Gulf of Mexico with some advanced infections. I even personally experienced one recently, from a fall on some rocks, in Greece. Seeing VagabondingLife.com and their Travel Injury Pictorial, reminded me how common these infections can be and hard they are to treat properly.

I was fortunate enough to hear Dr. Auerbach lecture on this topic, at the Expedition Medicine Conference and will attempt to do one of his favorite topics some justice.

First, this is a very large topic to discuss and I will attempt to focus on superficial skin infections associated with marine environments, for this post. Basically, a cut or scrape that is exposed to salt water and then gets infected. Discussion of things such as contact dermatitis, marine animal envenomations and bites require another discussion.

I think anybody who has spent anytime around salt water has gotten a scrape or cut, while in the water. For me, it has come from being bounced off a coral reef while surfing, slipping on rocks or having a cut from another activity and then swimming later in the trip. Anytime you break your skin and come into contact with marine water, you are at risk for specialized types of infections, not encountered on land or fresh water.


Potential sources of pollution[edit]
The materials used in most artificial reefs often cause pollution by releasing chemicals and nutrients that are not naturally found in reef environments. Ships can release polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos, iron, lead paint and anti-fouling paint leaches into the ocean and enters the food-chain.[15]
Dumping old tires into the ocean was a practice used to create many artificial reefs. In Florida alone, 571 permitted artificial reefs exist and the number of illegal reefs is thought to be much greater.[11] Tires are made from many chemicals and compounds such as black carbon, sulphur, zinc oxide and peroxides. The US National Artificial Reef Plan states that tires are a good reef construction material because no toxic substances are released from the decomposition of tires; though there is little information published to back up the claims and the future decomposing of the many different types of rubber tires could create unseen pollution.[16]
The use of tires has fallen out of favor with marine biologists. Tropical storms may demolish the tire containment system, washing tires onto beaches, destroying nearby coral reefs and inhibiting new coral growth.[17] As a result, states such as Florida and the country of France have begun large scale removal of tire reefs.[18][19] On the Osborne Reef off the coast of Fort Lauderdale, Florida boaters were allowed to dump unsecured tires at the site. Storms broke the nylon straps holding the original tire bundles together. Since 2007 approximately 130,000 of an estimated 700,000 tires have been removed.[20] At other artificial reef sites hurricanes pushed tires up on beaches from Florida to North Carolina, damaging reefs, causing pollution and requiring costly cleanup.[21] As a result, the Ocean Conservancy now includes tire removal during the International Coastal Cleanup in September of each year.[22]


Rubber Tire Leachates in the Aquatic Environment

Article in Reviews of environmental contamination and toxicology 151:67-115 · February 1997
DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4612-1958-3_3 · Source: PubMed

Abstract
Tires have a deleterious effect on the environment. This review discusses the background of scrap tires discarded in the environment, including tire composition, adverse environmental effects, threats to public health and safety, and solid waste management. Despite the widespread use of scrap tires in environmental applications, both land-based and aquatic, data on the indicators of environmental degradation are extremely scarce. Indicators of environmental degradation include analysis of chemicals within the water and sediment, analysis of contaminants within organisms, and analysis of the biological effects of these compounds on plants, animals, microbes, and organelles. Although these indicators are most useful when used in parallel, a review of the available information on chemical characterization of tire leachate from tire storage facilities, manufacturing, usage in recycling applications, and toxicity exposure studies, of vegetation surveys from waste tire areas and reviews of mammalian tire product toxicity, and of toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of tire exposure in experimental aquatic animals, microbes, and organelles is presented. The major characteristics of these studies are discussed in specific sections. The “Discussion and Conclusions” section discusses and summarizes the biological effects and chemical characterization of tire leachates. A global environmental perspective is included to improve our understanding of the deficiency of the current knowledge of tire leachate toxicity from various sources and to encourage interdisciplinary studies to establish the pattern of pollution associated with waste tire management.


Full text of “The Aquatic toxicity of scrap automobile tires”

https://archive.org/stream/aquatictoxicityo00ontauoft/aquatictoxicityo00ontauoft_djvu.txt


(.) #10

So at the Osborne reef 4 tires were connected with metal clips.
With a tire chain, probably 2000 tire would be connected.
That 2000 tire being connected might be an important factor.

Was there any studies of harmful chemical release of those tires.
If not, why not?

Marine infections is a different topic than car tires.


(.) #11

2000 tires being connected:

The average dept of the Pacific Ocean is 2.5 mile according to NOAA.
1mile = 1600 meters, 2.5 miles = 4000 m.

I estimate 1 tire, cut into 4 loops, would make about 4 m. It would take 1000 tires to get to 4000 m.
Plus another 4000 m to lay on the ocean floor, may be with anchors on it.

Something like that can be pulled up again, re floated and towed somewhere else to move out of
jurisdiction.

There are tires: the USA produces 260 million used tires a year.

Placing anchored buoys 1 mile apart, a matrix can be made of 100 miles by 100 miles using
20 million tires. Growing kelp in such a large field might be beneficial for the CO2 in the
atmosphere too, not to mention the possible other benefits of an interacting ecosystem like that.

So, underwater buoys about 20 m deep, and to grow kelp on each between the buoy and the surface.
(give and take a few meters)


(.) #12

May be one more comment about tires safety.
Tires are all around us. Yes, they are on vehicles, and the vehicles are all around us.
Even electric vehicles have tires on their wheels.
Off or on wheels and vehicles, or stored.


(Larry G) #13

The materials used in most artificial reefs often cause pollution by releasing chemicals and nutrients that are not naturally found in reef environments. Ships can release polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos, iron, lead paint and anti-fouling paint leaches into the ocean and enters the food-chain

I have substantial skepticism whenever anybody talks about asbestos as a pollutant.

There is ONE danger from asbestos. That danger is inhaling fibers that lodge in the tender tissues of the lungs. Asbestos is not toxic. It is not poisonous. It is not mutagenic. It is not an inhalant hazard underwater. It is not an inhalant hazard when buried. It is not an inhalant hazard when it is left undisturbed.

Asbestosis is a grossly mis-represented and over-hyped problem, for anyone outside of the asbestos processing industry.

I have heard claims that heavy metals contaminate used tires from a combination of the manufacturing process, the roads, and proximity to internal combustion engines. I have not seen anything I consider super reliable that indicates this is more of a problem than many other commonly-accepted things.Used tires are simply further along the ugly scale. Here’s a news flash. Heavy metals exist in nature in certain concentrations everywhere. Just because something is unaesthetic doesn’t make it pollution.

Iron also exists in nature, in the water of the ocean, in plants and animals- in fact no animal on Earth can live without iron, as it is vital component in hemoglobin and necessary for oxygen exchange. Pure-ish Iron outcrops exist from volcanic action all over the world, under water and on land. Iron is not a “pollutant”.

5.0 CONCLUSIONS

Overall the evidence suggests that tires in Ontario waters are unlikely to cause acute lethality to
trout and other aquatic life primarily because relatively low rates of water flow can provide
sufficient dilution to prevent the effect.


(.) #14

Farther philosophy:

Cars go in snow, and rain. Do harmful chemicals get leached by snow and rain from car tires,
and enter the food chain or the groundwater that later becomes drinking water?
Agricultural vehicles (for example: tractors) have tires, and those go in mud and snow.
Lots of contact with water.

One more thought, wow children’s playground is often covered by rubber carpet made from
ground up used car tires. Is there, or can there be a harmful effect?


(Larry G) #15

Imbalance of many things can kill you. Too much oxygen or oxygen at too high of a pressure is toxic and can cause seizures. That doesn’t make oxygen a pollutant. You can drink so much water that your electrolyte levels drop and you die. That doesn’t make water a pollutant.


(.) #16

Drinking seawater can kill a human. Is seawater a pollutant?

And nitrogen: nitrogen gas at high pressure, under water causes nitrogen toxicity.
Yet, 78% of the air we breath is nitrogen (N2).


#17

Freshwater application… Seawater is also highly reactive, which is why vessels tend to last much longer with far less maintenance in lakes, ponds rivers and streams…

As for Asbestos… If someone is cutting tires up, they’re potentially at risk of Mesothelioma and Asbestosis, from Asbestos used in Rubber…


(.) #18

If you or a loved one suffered an asbestos-related illness after working at Goodyear Tire & Rubber or another Ohio rubber plant, and have questions about the legal remedies

No, thank you.

Workers who were employed in the rubber manufacturing industry prior to that time may have an increased risk of developing mesothelioma cancer.

May be the asbestos was in the factory not in the tire.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company is best known for producing automobile tires but it also manufactured a number of other products, including rubberized gaskets which contained asbestos. Some rubber manufacturing plants may have even used raw asbestos in rubber mixtures to produce rubber sheets that were used for gaskets, seals and electrical insulations.
Rubber manufacturing workers may have been exposed to talc used during the molding process. The talc dust used by workers was often contaminated with asbestos.

Is the asbestos in the car tires or in other products? Also know to manufacture tires.


#19

Hazards to Ohio Rubber Plant Workers

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company is best known for producing automobile tires but it also manufactured a number of other products, including rubberized gaskets which contained asbestos. Some rubber manufacturing plants may have even used raw asbestos in rubber mixtures to produce rubber sheets that were used for gaskets, seals and electrical insulations.
Rubber manufacturing workers may have been exposed to talc used during the molding process. The talc dust used by workers was often contaminated with asbestos.
Regardless of their position in the past 50 years, most rubber factory workers faced an occupational exposure. Production sites were built with asbestos bricks, drywall, and heating and water pipes. Asbestos gaskets were used to seal pipes, pumps, and equipment.
The following positions are considered high-risk:
• Assembly line workers—belts and belt drives were often reinforced with asbestos fibers
• Machine maintenance crews
• Warehouse part pickers

Goodyear Knowingly Put Workers at Risk

An uncovered corporate document in the Goodyear archives from as early as 1939 showed the company’s medical director issuing a warning about the dangers of asbestos dust and asbestosis.
Asbestos fibers can circulate through the air where they are easily inhaled or ingested and lodged in the tissue surrounding the lungs. This may lead to the development of cancers, asbestosis and mesothelioma.
An inspection report showed the plant operation was “exceedingly dirty with asbestos.” OSHA compliance data for the industry indicate over-exposures to asbestos.

Other Rubber Plant Locations with Asbestos Risk

Rubber factory workers may have been exposed to asbestos products at other Ohio manufacturers. Some of the notable include:
• Uniroyal—Port Clinton, Ohio and Painesville, Ohio
• B.F. Goodrich—Akron, Ohio
• Firestone—Akron, Ohio
• General Tire—Akron, Ohio


(.) #20

So, it is not the tires that have asbestos risks. It is the factory. An it is in past tense.

I donno, I never worked in Ohio, in a chemical factory. And I am not planning to, but
thank you for the info.