Ice barge or boat


(noboxes) #1

This is an attempt to gather proof, to network about, that a boat made primarily of ice is viable under conditions the builder says so, except for seasteading conditions the floatie must float for at least a month on it’s own, with people routinely getting on/off it, and carrying a load typical of people camping and living on it. The sawdust/sawchip boat made by the military in a lake in Canada is discounted because of it’s initial cost plus calculated ongoing cost vs a “normal” boat of the same carrying capacity. Your ice boat must also be as economical to build/operate as a normal boat you’d be replacing, whatever class you choose (cat, barge, rowboat, etc).

So the time is now end of March, winter is almost terminated in the northern hemisphere, and is winter within planning stages in the southern hemisphere. (/me waves to the friends in Oz and NZ) I was wondering if anyone serious about boats and barges made of ice or sawdust-ice or straw-ice or steel-rebar-ice or fiberglas-ice or basalt-ice had gone out and set a water sprinkler on a form this winter. Did you flip a boat on it’s back, wax the hull, and spray water on it like it’s a mold, stick ice cubes to it to build up bulk really fast, to make a boat-shape? Did anyone saw a prototype deck slab from a frozen lake? Did you prep the area by setting out some rebar for the lake to make ice around? Did you get the build plans for a normal steel barge, and duplicate it in any combination of reinforcing and ice? Did you use the steel forms (used for pouring concrete walls) to pour ice water? Did you use two inches of pink poly foam slabs to insulate it? Did you cover the hull in EPDM? Did you rent the marina’s parking area (it’s cheap during winter season!) to make an “ice rink”, set out a honeycomb pattern of five gallon buckets on the ice, and every day add rebar and water between the buckets, and top it off with another “ice rink” slab? When will you be launching your ice boat creation? Do take lots of pics and videos!

So what did anyone do? I want proof that the nay-sayers are wrong about boats made of ice!

@octavian , any idea why the “eskimos” didn’t make ice boats? The could have used sinew, bone, fur, etc as reinforcing vs wood chips. They made igloos…

PS: this does not say i am not a nay-sayer.


(.) #2

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(Alexander Tomasik) #4

Well ocean water is quite cold, therefore if you can keep the sun off it and prevent thermal bridging it’d probably be possible.


(.) #5

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(noboxes) #6

That really depends on where you are. Ocean water at the equator is quite warm.

So did you build one?


(.) #7

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(noboxes) #8

I know, but the bastige got onto me for being a naysayer, so i had to throw him a bone. I’d like to know who is actually building floaties a human can live and work on, even if they aren’t ice. I suspect we’ll get only bare survival river houseboats and retired people on backwood canals or yachts in marinas.


(.) #9

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(.) #14

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#15

LOL, no clue. I live in Florida :wink:


(system) #16

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