Direct democracy on the blockchan


(Bill Noyb) #22

Yes, I agree. This is a good subject to be addressed by the constitution, along with that wider definition of the mission of government and the stipulation that it remain within the defined boundaries. I tend to be a strict constructionist, but I also acknowledge that there are always grey areas. The most basic aspect of what people used to call the American Experiment is the idea of limiting government’s mission. Those who go into government service, for good motives or bad, always seem to want to push those boundaries, with the results you describe. And the longer they stay, the worse it gets, so I think any government offices should be temporary, like jury duty, or at least not paying more than covering expenses.


#23

While I agree that representative democracy is the best option available to date, and that localized government provides more personal engagement and oversight of the representative …

… I think it’s important to remember that “democracy”, as originally conceived, didn’t allow those “minorities” the opportunity to participate.

The lowest of social classes didn’t get to vote … and slaves were usually nothing more than property.

So … it was (and is) very easy for “people like me” to find common ground on the most devisive of social issues, simply because “people like me” who are in the privileged class have defined those social issues in our favor.

Consequently, it’s a logical fallacy to pretend that the ancient Greek version of “democracy” is directly compariable to our modern situation, simply because their “democracy” excluded social classes our modern democracies now include.

Home Owners Associations have more in common with ancient Greek democracy than do modern governments. HOAs typically exclude renters from voting, limiting that right to only property owners.

Imagine trying to impose THAT rule upon the tenant-class in any western city. :open_mouth:

However, blockchains can greatly leverage ‘contract execution’ - which is a business model more than a governance model - and that type of paradigm shift (governance by contract vs democracy) has great potential.

For example … road repair. Government rarely delivers what they promise taxpayers. But if that ‘tax’ payment was part of a blockchain contract, then payments could be contingent upon performance instead of an irreversible tax levy. How might THAT type of democratic participation affect the vote of citizens? :unamused:

Therefore … I look at blockchain technology as a potential game changer that ultimately might rewrite the rules of governance and politics, and in ways we haven’t yet conceptualized.


#24

It still looks like a corporate controlled (rigged) system.

Whoever has the most money, buys the most voting power and wins buy default, the way it’s described in this thread. THAT is NOT Democracy, NOT representative, and most certainly excludes entire swaths of special interests, whether ‘minorities’, or even majorities with insufficient buying power.


#25

Interesting,…How would that be different from a fingerprint reading soft that could work as well?

I would say that @ this point (after 10 years of “seasteading”) the kind of democratic governance the seasteaders want is still a bit of a fuzzy abstract notion.

Other than that :wink: , of course that direct democracy is the way to go!


(Bill Noyb) #26

I think that the reason for this, and the reason for the resulting lack of consensus you describe, is that our idea of who is a person capable of participating in governance has changed over time. Being a software engineer, I long ago learned how inconsistent people can be in their thinking without even noticing it. So we called that form of government “democracy”, the rule of the people, without quite realizing who “the people” were, or who thought they should be included. So those historically in power have had to share that power with more and more people. Non-landowners? Okay, they have a stake in society. Women? Oh my God! Black people who were kidnapped and forced to work in slavery for generations can’t possibly be able to… um, well, gee whiz, maybe they actually aren’t all that different from us, given half a chance.

The white boys see it as losing power. Their fearful cry is “You can’t replace us!” But nobody wants to replace them, they just want recognition that they have a stake in society. Most of us would like a society in which those with power do not lord it over those without. I believe that increasing access to participate in government will make everybody feel better about the outcome. Humans being what they are, this is not the only thing that needs to happen, but it is at least something that can push us in the right direction.


(Bob LLewellyn) #27

Why do people desire power? I do not, so it isn’t unanimous. But the power to control others stems from the belief that there is a finite amount of everything so to make sure they will be taken care of, that seams to be why, people desire power. I look at power over others as basically evil. I have no right to control someone else so any action to usurp their right of self determination is a violation of moral principles. Representative government such as I live under is usurping the wants, needs, and desires of others.

The reality is that there is an abundant amount of everything. We made sure of that when we made the universe. I watched as panic set in during the Arab oil embargo. We’ve reached peak oil, how will we survive? We grow our own.

In this plane of our existence, we have the power over our own existence. We invent new things, discover new things, and become more or better of a thing ourselves in the process. Things in motion, tend to continue the motion unless acted on by another force. If we only look at the direction of events, yes, Dr. Hawkins is probably correct is his opinion of society’s demise in 100 to 1000 years. But we are the other force acting on it.

Seasteads will become common place and we will be able to handle the population growth, and when it comes time that the entire planet is full, we will have a head start on the other planets and even solar systems. What is truly needed is for us to stop using emotions to make decisions and to start using our heads. Just think it through.

Violence is a failure in the process. Those prone to violence are those quick to fail. Unfortunately its looking more and more like we are about to fail big time in Korea.

We need to get our plans moving faster. And not just for Marinea alone but all of the different projects. This calls for a new way to reach the other humans on this planet. Some times its better to stand and fight and sometimes its better to run. We can’t control this mess. All we can do is to side step the force. We need a seastead to go to now, democracy is failing us.
Bob