Designing Access From the Water & Other Human Factors


(Larry G) #1

[For semi-submerged spheres], the part of the sphere that emerges from the water has a curvature. Once that curvature goes a bit vertical, it’s no longer useful for occupation by people. Just to take a WAG at where it starts to be a trade-off, most human activities don’t take place on a surface more than 30 degree or so- that’s where (for example) vineyards start to become impractical for machinery to navigate and for people to stand and do manual labor. It takes a pretty large sphere to appear flat- even the Earth’s curvature is observable from a moderately tall structure like a tall sailing mast.

I should have said, “A sphere also has a minimum size where the emergent disc is useful.”

ABS GUIDE FOR CERTIFICATION OF OFFSHORE ACCESS GANGWAYS AUGUST 2016

ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING INTO THE DESIGN OF OFFSHORE INSTALLATIONS JULY 2014

ABS GUIDE FOR DROPPED OBJECT PREVENTION ON OFFSHORE UNITS AND INSTALLATIONS


Stability of Semi-submerged Spheres
(Wilfried Ellmer) #2

A ocean sphere will have the same access setup as a highrise building (staircase and elevator) - the only difference is that you push the down botton instead of the up botton when entering the elevator.

The key is, to understand, that the inner ambient in an ocean sphere, will be no different to urban ambients that already exist around us.

To understand this properly see a picture collection of feasible ambients for ocean spheres here


#3

Definitely a problem that needs to be addressed in all designs: it is applicable to small structures but as you point out even more so to large structures (whether tall or deep). Skyscrapers actually are already impacted by this and the mortality rate for medical events above a certain floor number increases astronomically. Large spheres would be even harder pressed to address the vertical transportation problem given their large volume to surface area (unless most of that volume was left empty as per some of the designs with atriums).

Personally, I like to think outside the box: why not have personal submarines or escape pods which can be jettisoned in an emergency? They could be maintained at one atmosphere and launched from any location outside the structure with an access hatch or dock. Alternatively, for structures above the water, quadcopters could be used as escape devices or even regular transportation. I understand the costs are currently high but, with technological developments and economies of scale, this is entirely possible (especially passive positively buoyant escape pods which float to the surface one jettisoned).


(Larry G) #4

There’s a whole ecosystem to these design questions.

http://www.condo-owner.com/article/the-fire-department’s-ladder-truck-won’t-reach-my-unit/

Emergency access equipment influences building design and vice versa.


(Larry G) closed #5

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