Biorock Experiments


(Theodore M. Amenta) #22

May I offer a related not-engineering comment. I have explored the financial feasibility of seasteads. I am comfortable sharing my findings. I expect you all are able to define the physical feasibility — or not. I encourage you to share your thought about cost for such a platform. I can articulate the “value.” As I guide only let me offer that the platform cost can not exceed 20% of the total occupied use.

This is an approximation only but please accept this for this moment. A single level of building occupancy might be thought to be 150 pounds / square foot. So the displacement must be grater than this. What volume of biorock is required for this? What si the cost for this displacement? Can we go to 2 levels of human occupancy? Can we go to 3 or 4 or 5? At what cost?

I am offering to do the pro-forma financial analysis if you all can join to provide the cost / square foot of platform cost and displacement. I know that my economics are odd on an engineering thread — Financial feasibility is part of a simultaneous equation ---- engineer is another. My credentials can be found at www.amentaco.com ---- Ted


(.) #23

Welcome back Ted. Thank you for the post.
I do not know the answers to your questions.
Best regards;


(.) #24

One more idea for the biorock experiments:

To make a metal plate as an electrode connecting device. (cathode (-) negative).
To place a charcoal piece on it, so the electricity would flow through the piece of
charcoal. The other electrode (anode (+) positive) would be a blunt metallic needle
with seawater drip formation. This could be in a carbon dioxide atmosphere.

The seawater drip would complete the circuit to produce precipitation of calcium and
magnesium salts on the charcoal piece.


#25

That’s a huge variable factor of many other variables,…


(Cole Santos) #26

That’s very similar to what plan to do. Charcoal dust on the cathode to thicken hull


(.) #27

I tried to measure conductivity of charcoal. Not very favorable at 12 V DC.
Measurements of resistance is high. That is not very favorable either.
The brand I got is Simple Truth , lump charcoal, 100% natural hardwood.


(.) #28

Perhaps graphitization of charcoal carbon would help:

Catalytic graphitization of carbons by various metals

Abstract
A study was made of the catalytic graphitization of carbons by 22 kinds of metals. Heat treatments were carried out at 2600°C for 1 hr and 3000°C for 10 min under argon atmosphere. In graphitizing 3,5-dimethyl phenol-formaldehyde resin carbon powder with which 20w/o metal powder (Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Ca, Ti, V, Mo and W) was mixed, graphitic carbon was catalytically formed. The first six metals, which belong to the carbon dissolution-precipitation mechanism, gave large graphitic crystal flakes at an early stage of the reaction; the other metals resulted in fine crystals through the carbide formation-decomposition mechanism. For the non-graphitizing phenol formaldehyde resin carbon in which 10w/o metal powder was dispersed, Mg, Si, Ca, Cu and Ge catalyzed formation of only graphitic carbon; and Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mo and W formed both graphitic and urbostratic carbons. Except for Al and Cu, the former effect was exerted by non-transition metals and the latter effect by transition metals. Boron alone markedly accelerated homogeneous graphitization of both kinds of carbon; and Zn, Sn, Sb, Pb and Bi had no catalytic effect. On the basis of these results, the relationships between some properties of the metals, their catalytic abilities and the kind of catalytic effects are discussed

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0008622379900204


(.) #29

I suspect that charcoal might work with higher voltages.


(.) #30

Appears to be that the conductivity of charcoal increases when its temperature
increases. In the case of using charcoal as an electrode, there is little chance
for such an increase of temperature.


(Cole Santos) #31

I want to try microwave hydrocarbonization with simultaneous electrolysis. Make a nano slurry from biomass.

I just got my power supply in. Going to Wal-Mart to get a 10 gallon fish tank soon. So far I have carbon fiber and graphite drawing pencils for testing. Titanium and platinized titanium expanded metal comes soon.

For an interesting industrial application i was thinking of, hawaii has titianium rich soils. I was thinking it might be fun to electolyize some on an titanium mesh. I’m hoping the iron and other impurities will dissolve leaving me with titanium rich dust on the expanded mesh. At the same time the other electrodes will create iron rich calcium deposits as well as some nasty electrolyte.


(Larry G) #32

Did you measure resistance when wetted or when dry? Using seawater?


(.) #33

I measured it dry. (and at least twenty characters)


(.) #34

Catalytic Graphetization - An Experiment by Robert Murray-Smith.:


(.) #35

How To Make Charcoal (Using Stir Sticks and Paint Cans) by The King of Random:


(.) #36

Mg and Ca again. Seawater has Mg and Ca ions in it. Wood or organic plant matter
could be converted to charcoal.

During conversion would there be graphitization because of the presence of Mg and Ca ions?


(Samuel Boyce) #37

I did all of this as an experiment in 2012/13, It works, and the people from the fish store thought I was crazy! Someone please put me to work, honest employment is all I’m asking in exchange and I’ll build you a private island in a fraction of the time at a fraction of the cost. I’ve been trying to find someone to let me use dock space anywhere along the ocean to build larger prototypes. I’m a US Army veteran and I’m good with the bare minimum.


(Cole Santos) #38

I’m not sure anyone here has a real company to hire you. If you make it to hawaii I’ll help.


(Ztevan Whyte) #39

Woah Robert Murray Smith is a cool guy and very smart. I sent him my how to make graphene with sugar and hydrogen peroxide video and he congratulated me :slight_smile:

He is a nice and knowledgeable person I love his work it’s cool to see someone else know about him <3


(.) #40

Congratulation on the sugar with hydrogen peroxide. Do you still have that video?

Yes, Robert Murray-Smith is a cool guy.


(.) #41

I do not have a real company to hire anyone.