Barges for sale


#1

http://www.sunmachinery.com/barges_for_sale.html


#2

I mention it only because they are large and flat, some still have hotels on them, and some people here have liked the idea of a barge.

So you take a $200,000 barge (there’s some cheaper) that’s 220x75ft, divide it into 64 blocks 16x16ft, lease-sell them for $275/mo, and the buyer must build or buy their own structure. Buyers can purchase more than one block, adjacent or separated. If the barge is offshore, buyers arrange their own transport, they can rent it from you, or buy a water taxi token. Sell utilities to the buyers as needed. Yep, it’s in the “Wild Ideas” category.

Still need a reason to be out there. Having 64 people crank up cheap outboards at 4:30am to get to a job on shore won’t be fun, especially in bad weather.


#3

Couple questions:
elmer and anyone else in the marine industry:
What is the average drydock cost for a vessel of that size, what items normally require repair, replacement, or refurbishment, and can routine maintenance of this sort indefinitely ensure the structural integrity of the barge either in enclosed waters, or anchored in coastal regions?

KatOnTri: I am assuming you meant this as a project within a bay or something similiar inside a nation’s territorial waters. If so what nation, what ongoing fees have you forseen for maintenance of the barges, and what issues can you see with the size and scope of ‘landowners’ constructions and their effect on the continued feasibility of economically drydocking the barge for future repairs?


#4

No, no. You misunderstand. I posted the site only trying to be helpful to those who prefer a barge and need to save a buck or two :

Some of the barges on that site are surprisingly cheap. I don’t prefer a barge for anything but the calmest water. And i don’t have $150k or $1,400k. And i don’t want to live anywhere i’d have neighbors. That said, a store-barge (in a bay during storms or on open water in calm weather), catering to people living on the water, would be an interesting place to visit. And if somehow a seastead did need huge amounts of whatever transported (building up a seamount?), they are the cheapest way to move it. If you got permission to plant a permanent seastead in shallow water somewhere, even a barge with holes in it’s bottom will sit on the bottom with 1,000 of tons of gravel in it.


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